Wet Reckless and DUI in California

Have you heard about friends or family getting a DUI charge reduced to a Wet Reckless?  This will tell you what it means, when it’s done, and how it can help you.

What is a “Wet Reckless”?

A “wet reckless” is a nickname for a charge of reckless driving involving alcohol or drugs.  It is a common reduced charged from a plea bargain.

Will the prosecutor agree to a Wet Reckless?

There are no hard and fast rules as to when a prosecutor will agree to a Wet Reckless plea bargain, but your chances are higher depending on your BAC and whether there are evidence problems in the prosecution’s case against you.

What are the advantages of a Wet Reckless plea bargain?

    • Shorter max penalty:  The maximum jail time is shorter, so if you violate probation then you face a shorter max jail penalty.
  • Shorter minimum penalty: If this is your second or third DUI within a ten year period, then certain mandatory jail sentences will apply. If you enter a plea to wet reckless instead of DUI, then the conviction only requires five days in jail regardless of your prior history.
  • Shorter probation period.  Wet reckless often has a shorter probation period than a typical DUI.
  • DUI School:  You’ll likely have a shorter DUI school with wet reckless than DUI.  
  • Fines:  Penalty assessments that are lower for Wet Reckless than DUI may make the total cost of a Wet Reckless less expensive than a DUI.
  • License advantages:  A wet reckless plea may help out on the license suspension from the court, but there is also the DMV license suspension – so it may or may not impact your driver’s license.

Don’t get too excited about a Wet Reckless because it still packs a punch in many ways:

    • Insurance Company: The insurance company will likely still ding your record with the Wet Reckless.
    • Repeat Offender:  If you get another DUI within ten years after your Wet Reckless, you’ll still be considered a repeat offender, even though Wet Reckless is different than a DUI.
  • License Suspension: The DMV can still take your license.  

 

 

Common Questions About Your Divorce in California

This article will examine some of questions that are commonly asked about the divorce process in California.  It will help you get a broad overview of the process and understand what to expect.

Do I have to wait 6 months to get divorced in California?

Yes, although the waiting period can be challenging for couples, six months is the minimum and its common for the divorce process to take longer than six months.

Can I remarry during the waiting period?

No, unfortunately you can’t remarry while you are waiting for the divorce to be finalized.

Why is date of separation important?

The separation date is important in determining what property is community property (must be split) and separate property.

Should I sell or mortgage the house while we are separated?

You’ll want to hold off on making major changes to assets or debts during the separation/divorce process.

Does it matter what state we live in?

Yes, in order to file for divorce in California you or your spouse must have lived in California for at least six months.  You also need to have lived in the county for at least three months.

What are some of the important factors for determining temporary child support?

Important factors in determining child support are each parent’s income and the amount of time each parent takes care of the child.  

Do I need to wait to get spousal support?

Spousal support can be granted with an Order to Show Cause early in the divorce process, so you do not need to wait until the divorce process has progressed for temporary spousal support.

What’s the general timeline of important steps in the divorce process?

  • The first step is a Petition with the Court and serving the Petition on the other spouse.  This marks the beginning of the waiting period.
  • The next step is responding to the Petition and perhaps an order to Show Cause if certain disputes are involved.
  • Hearings or mediation can be scheduled to resolve certain issues.
  • Dividing property is a step that will happen somewhere along the process. As part of this, discovery and disclosure of assets and obligations will be conducted.
  • Settlement Agreements occur where you and your spouse are able to reach an consensus.

While this is not a complete list, it gives an overview of some of the steps in the divorce process and helps you understand important questions relating to your divorce. For answers to specific questions you may have, consult with an attorney who has experience in family law to guide you through the sometimes intricate divorce process.

 

Unusual DUI Defenses

Do not give up just because you have been charged with a DUI.  There may be a myriad of defenses that you can use to inspire reasonable doubt as to the elements that the prosecution must prove to convict you. In a previous article, we discussed some of the Best Common Defenses and Arguments for a DUI.  Here we examine a few ideas to get you thinking outside the box if your case has rare or unusual circumstances. An attorney will be able to evaluate your individual circumstances to spot any defenses that might be successful.

Were you actually “driving”?

In some cases, the police officer didn’t see you driving, so a defense to the DUI may lie in rebutting the circumstantial evidence that you were driving.

  • Did you deny driving?
  • Were there other people in the car?
  • Was the car discovered when it was legally parked?

Watch out here, though, because if the officer observed even a slight movement of the vehicle, then that counts as driving.  Also, watch for circumstantial evidence that that prosecution may use to show that you were driving – i.e. your car was warm, the keys were in the ignition, or close proximity to an accident.

Were you under the influence when driving?

In some instances, such as a hit and run collision or single vehicle collision, the police officer may not have caught up to you at the time of the incident.  If you were drinking right after the alleged incident, then this can call into question whether you were actually under the influence at the time you were driving.  Along similar lines, if your BAC was under the legal limit, but rose to a higher value after you were no longer driving, then this could be another point of defense that you were not under the influence when actually driving.

Do you have any special medical or physical conditions that may have impacted the testing?

Think about any challenges that apply to you specifically.  Do you have a condition that may have affected the blood or breath testing?  Do you have a physical condition that would have impaired your ability on the field sobriety testing?  Was there anything usual about the environmental conditions where the tests were administered?

Police conduct?

In some cases, police misconduct can provide a valuable defense in a case.  Were statements made to indicate racial profiling for the stop? Did the police act improperly in the way that the tests were conducted? Was there anything amiss in the way evidence was handled?

Extenuating circumstances?

Were you forced to drive by some emergency?  Were you given the alcohol or drugs without your consent or awareness?  Although extenuating circumstances may or may not provide a defense to the charge, they can be important argument points in making the case for a plea bargain with the prosecutor.

 

Best DUI Arguments and Defenses

Although each case varies, this article will cover some of the best DUI arguments and defenses to consider when analyzing your DUI charge

Motion to Suppress Evidence

If your attorney files a Motion to Suppress Evidence and it is granted, then that evidence can’t be used against you by the prosecutor.  This is often used in the context of the traffic stop, where the motion argues that the officer didn’t have reasonable suspicion to stop you.  If successful, this can be a powerful arrow in your DUI defense arsenal.

Legitimate Reasons for the Signs of Intoxication

Are there legitimate reasons for the signs that the officer observed, which are circumstantial evidence against you?  For example, do you have dry eyes that cause redness? Do you have a speech impediment that causes slurred speech? Could your symptoms be explained by fatigue?  Plausible explanations for the symptoms can be a good argument to oppose the evidence of intoxication.

Field Sobriety Tests

There are many ways to attack the field sobriety test evidence:  Do you have a physical limitation or are you taking medications that inhibit your ability to successfully complete?  Were they adequately explained and administered by the officer? Were there environmental factors such as weather, traffic, or the surface where the tests were performed that could impact the testing?

Faulty Testing

Here again, there are many ways to attack the reliability of blood or breath testing.  Was the device working? Were there medications or medical conditions that could have impacted the testing? Was the testing done properly? Was the evidence placed in a proper chain of custody?

* Acid Reflux Defense – this is a subset argument that alleges that acid reflux (a medical condition) can cause the BAC reading to be falsely higher

* Rising BAC level – a valuable subset argument to testing is the rising BAC defense, which alleges that the BAC rose between the time the defendant was driving and when the test was administered.  

    This is not an exhaustive list of DUI defenses, as the possibilities are as individual and unique as the particular facts of your case.  This list explains some of the commonly utilized defenses to help you and your attorney begin building a proper defense strategy.

 

4 Potential Consequences of Your Second DUI

If you are facing your second DUI, you are probably somewhat familiar with the process and the punishments. Don’t give up on your case, as you may have defenses and arguments that can get the charges dismissed or reduced. This article is to give you an idea of what consequences you are facing if your defenses are not successful to help you understand the worst case scenario, and it assumes you are 21 or over.  

Driving Consequences

  • Suspended License:  The DMV will automatically suspend your license for a year on a second DUI. You could have your licenses suspended for up to 2 years. The court suspension is two years, which can be run concurrently with the DMV suspension. It’s possible to apply for a restricted license after three months of DMV suspension.  
    • You need to request a hearing with the DMV within 10 days if you want to dispute the DMV suspension.
  • Interlock Device:  The judge can order you to get an interlock device on your vehicle, which measures your breath alcohol every time you drive.
  • SR-22 Insurance. If you don’t win the DMV hearing or don’t dispute it, and your license is suspended, you will need to get a special type of automobile insurance called SR-22 insurance for three years.

Court Ordered Counseling and Probation

  • 18 Month Programs:  If this is your second conviction in 10 years, you will likely be ordered to complete an 18 month program.  For a third offense, you would typically be looking at a 30 month program. You may also be ordered to attend AA, or Mother’s Against Drunk Driving (MADD) or other programs.
  • Probation: Probation is typically 3-5 years.

Jail Time – Max is 1 year

  • Jail Time:  Minimum of 96 hours in county jail, and maximum of one year jail time.

Financial Consequences

  • Fines, penalties and costs. The court at its discretion will impose a fine of between $1800- $2700. Additionally, you will likely incur costs of defense attorney, costs for counseling, interlock device, and SR-22 insurance. The total cost can be very expensive, but consult with your attorney for an estimate of total costs.

 

How to Know if Your Assets Are Being Split Fairly In Divorce

Whether you are just considering a divorce, starting the process or right in the middle of it, at some point you are going to wonder if you are getting a fair shake. An attorney can look at your particular assets and debts and tell you the best plan for you, but this article will provide general information about the landscape of asset division in California and educate you to ask the right questions about the facts of your case.

  • Why do I need to care about community property vs. separate property?

In general, California law requires community property to be split between the spouses 50/50, whereas separate property may be retained solely by the spouse who owns the separate property.  

  • What is Community Property?

California Family Code provides the general definition of community property:  “Except as otherwise provided by statute, all property, real or personal, wherever situation, acquired by a married person during the marriage while domiciled in this state is community property.”

  • What is Separate Property?

California Family Code defines separate property in several sections, but the section that is broadest is as follows:  Separate property of a married person includes the following: 1) all property owned by the person before marriage, 2) all property acquired by the person after marriage by gift, bequest, devise or descent, 3) the rents, issues, and profits of the property described in this section.

  • Commingled funds make characterization challenging:

Commingling is where both separate property and community property have been combined in such a way that the character of the property isn’t clearly apparent upon first analysis. For example:

  • Down payment or loan money for the purchase of a home came from a gift to only one spouse, but community property funds have been used to pay mortgage.
  • A premarital bank account from one spouse is used by both spouses after the marriage, so it contains both pre-marriage separate property and community property funds.  

These are just a few examples of the myriad of ways that funds can be commingled. The process of sorting these out through tracing, etc. is beyond the scope of this article, but advice from an experienced family law attorney can assist in identifying and proving the proper character of commingled assets.

  • Determining the value of assets?

A key issue in fair division of assets is assessing the value of an asset. This can be challenging for some assets, but thinking through how the value of each item will be assessed is an important step in making sure you are getting a fair division.  

  • Don’t forget about debts.

The focus of this article has been assets, but don’t forget to calculate in the value of your debts. For example, a mortgage on real property, school loans, and credit card debt should never be left out of the analysis.

This is just the tip of the iceberg to get you thinking through issues relating to identifying community property and assessing its value.  The division of money and time with the children are the two most important issues facing many couples in divorce, so a thorough analysis of these issues by an experienced family law attorney will help you understand the law and achieve a fair resolution.

 

4 Potential Consequences of Your First DUI

Whether you have just been arrested for DUI or whether you are further down the road in the process, you need to be prepared for what is ahead. You likely have many potential defenses to fight the charge, which are discussed in other articles. For this article we will assume you are 21 or older and entered a guilty plea or conviction of a first DUI and give you a look at “worst case” scenario.

1. Driving Consequences

  • Suspended License:  The DMV will automatically suspend your license if you had a blood alcohol concentration of .08% or more for four months.  The DMV will suspend your license for a year if you refuse the test. You’ll need to pay a $125 fee to get your license reinstated at the end of the DMV suspension. The court can also suspend your license, which is typically run concurrent to the DMV suspension, meaning that both suspensions are in effect at the same time.  A driver may be able to get a restricted license, to drive only to certain places like place of employment.
      • If you want to fight the DMV suspension, you need to request a hearing within 10 days.  
  • Interlock Device:  You may be ordered to get an interlock device on your vehicle, which measures your breath alcohol every time you drive.
  • SR-22 Insurance. If you don’t win the DMV hearing or don’t dispute it, and your license is suspended, you will need to get a special type of automobile insurance called SR-22 insurance for three years.

2. Court Ordered Counseling and Probation

  • 3-9 Month Programs:  You will likely be ordered to complete one of three programs, with the program usually determined by your blood alcohol content (BAC) measurement from the DUI:  3 month (30 hour), 6 month (44 hour) or 9 month (60 hour program). Additional hours may also be required based on county requirements. Each program requires drug and alcohol education, hours of group counseling, and certain hours of individual counseling.
  • Probation: Probation is typically 3-5 years.

3. Jail Time – Max is 6 months

  • Jail Time:  Crimes come with a maximum punishment, but this does not mean the judge will impose the maximum jail time.  The maximum for a first offense is up to six months in jail.

4. Financial Consequences

  • Fines, penalties and costs. The court at its discretion will impose a fine of between $390- $1000. Additionally, you will likely incur costs of defense attorney, costs for counseling, money for the interlock device if ordered and the cost of SR-22 insurance. The total cost can be very expensive, but consult with your attorney for an estimate of total costs.

 

Men:  Who to Turn To If You Can’t Save Your Marriage and Divorce Is Imminent

Men, we know that it can be rough on you when you want to save your marriage, but you feel like there are issues that just can’t be resolved. When you reach that point, you may wonder what you should do to plan for the future.  Who should you turn to? This article will help you navigate the troubles that may come your way soon.

It’s never too early to educate yourself:  Consult an attorney who is experienced in divorce law.

Knowledge is power.  So, whether you’ve made the final decision or whether you are still in the mix of determining what to do, it’s never too early to consult with someone who can give you advice about your exact circumstances and assets. Here are some things you’ll want to discuss:

  • Children: discuss with your attorney how you can plan custody to best accommodate your work schedule and other commitments.
    • For example, what is your work schedule?  What is your spouse’s work schedule or does she primarily take care of the kids? Do you plan to move out of state?
  • Assets: Divorce is expensive for both parties because the assets will be split. Talk with your attorney about the assets you have and your preferred means of managing them in a divorce.
    • For example, do you want to sell the home or keep one spouse in it? Do you have a preference on dividing the cars?  Are there assets that have sentimental value or are meaningful to you in a way that goes beyond their monetary value?
  • Debts:  If you have school loans, car loans, credit card debt, mortgage debt, or any other kinds of debts, you need to plan for the division of these debts with your attorney.
    • Consider in advance any court costs that will be involved in the divorce, mediation fees, and legal fees.

Protect Your Mental Health and Amp up Your Physical Well-Being:  Turn to friends and family and other trusted advisors for encouragement.   

Plan for a tough time ahead. No matter how bad a marriage is, a divorce can still take a toll on both parties because it is a change. Things will be different.

  • Understand and anticipate powerful emotions.  During a divorce you may experience greater emotions of isolation, discouragement, despair, anger or bitterness.  Prepare for this by bolstering your own mental toughness.
    • Reach out to old friends. Go to lunch or the gym. Remember the good times.
    • Although you may not want to tell your family that divorce is imminent, it doesn’t hurt to contact them and renew family bonds so that those relationships are close for when you need the support.
  • Amp up your physical health. It’s common for men to forego their regular exercise or to take on bad eating habits during stressful events in their lives, and a divorce is commonly a stressful event that takes its toll on men’s health.
    • Do what works for you to keep yourself feeling good. Whether that’s setting fitness or nutrition goals, or working out with a buddy, or finding more time to be in nature, or running, etc., you need to do what works best for you personally to maintain good health.

Hard times are an inevitable part of a man’s life, and many guys will confirm that a divorce can be challenging.  If you prepare yourself with knowledge, protect your mental health, and amp up your physical well-being, you will be in a strong position to make the most out of the divorce process.

 

What Does It Mean to Establish Parentage and When Is It Necessary?

If you are having a baby, you may be wondering what you can do to protect your baby’s rights. You want your child to have all the support he or she needs from the father. Establishing parentage can be an important step for you to take if you are not married to the baby’s father. This article will walk you through some of the basics of establishing paternity and help explain why parentage is important.

  1. What is parentage? What is paternity?

When a child is born to parents who are married (or to parents in a domestic partnership after 2005), then the law presumes that the couple are the child’s parents.  If the parents are not married, then the father only has legal rights and responsibilities if parentage is established.  However, in some cases parentage will be presumed, such as “parentage by estoppel,” where the parent welcomed the child into his home and treated it as his own.

  1. Why is establishing parentage important?

If you want custody, visitation or child support orders from the court, parentage will have to be established. This can also be important in a same-sex parenting situations if the parents were not married when the mother became pregnant or when the child was born.  There are other advantages: having health and life insurance coverage from either parent, the right to inherit from either parent, the right to receive social security and veteran’s benefits, just to name a few.

  1. What if the father does not admit that he is the parent?

A court may order the alleged father, mother and child to be genetic tested in order to establish parentage.

  1. What are the consequences and rights of the parent after parentage is established?

A parent has generally the right to get custody or visitation rights related to the child, although this right may be impacted in some cases by criminal history. A parent also has a legal obligation to financially support the child, but the amount of financial support will vary depending on various factors including income, custody arrangements, etc.

  1. What are the ways to establish parentage when the child’s parents aren’t married or in a domestic partnership?
  • Signing and filing a voluntary Declaration of Paternity – this is a form that both parents voluntarily sign, which established them as the legal parents of the child. The advantage of the voluntary Declaration is that neither parent has to go to court. After the form is signed, it needs to be filed with the California Department of Child Support Services.
  • You local child support agency can bring an action to establish parentage of a child. This often happens as a matter of course when welfare is requested for the child.
  • You can bring your own court case to establish parentage, which will involve several court forms and possibly a trial. You may want to utilize the help of an attorney or an agency to navigate this process.

 

How Do We Divide Our Assets and Debts in Divorce?

Your attorney can help you with a plan for dividing property and debt, but here are three important steps to help you on the path to a successful division of assets and debts:

  1. Write down all property and all debts.

Making a list is the first step of dividing everything fairly. Here’s a list to get you started thinking through your own finances:

  • Real property – your home, land, investment properties
  • Other property – Furniture, jewelry, cash, technology, automobiles, recreational vehicles
  • Wage earnings
  • Investments – stocks in an individual account, Roth IRA, 401K
  • Health Saving Accounts
  • Pensions
  • Mortgage
  • Student Loans
  • Credit Card Debt
  • Automobile Loan
  • Loans from family members
  1. Label each as community property or separate property
  • Community property – assets, income, or debts earned or acquired during the marriage.
  • Separate property – property owned before the marriage, property inherited or gifted to one part during the marriage, money from the rent or sale of a separate property, money earned while legally or physically separated from the spouse, and items given from one spouse to the other with the intention of designating it as separate property.
  • Common question: What do we do with an asset that can’t be divided physically? For example, do we have to sell the house in order to divide the money?  The answer is that each spouse has to get assets equivalent in value, so in lieu of selling the house, one spouse may keep the house and the other would get the value of half of that asset.
  1. Place a value on each asset and debt.

In preparing for a divorce, it may be helpful to see if you and your spouse have the same estimation of the value of assets and debts or if there is a large disparity. For your list, make an estimate of the value of each item.

  • Be aware that some items may have more value than you realize. For example, a pension plan can be very valuable and special rules apply to pension plans. In this situation, consulting with an attorney on the value and division of the pension plan can be important.