How to Help Yourself When Dealing with an Ugly Divorce

Whether you were married a short time or for forever, whether you have kids or no kids, there is no easy divorce.  The end of a marriage is emotionally challenging for all parties involved.  If you have a spiteful spouse or a challenging custody situation, then the emotional toll can be even greater.  This article will give 5 tips on how to help yourself handle the emotional, financial, and physical trauma of an ugly divorce:

  1. Focus on Yourself.  When you are going through a separation or divorce, you need to give yourself permission to focus on you and what can best meet your needs.  This means something different for each individual.  For some, it may mean taking time to get outside and reconnect with nature.  For others, spending the time and money on massage or manicure may be therapeutic.  You may be in a place where you just want to lie in bed and be sad and do nothing.  You need to allow yourself to grieve in your own way.
  2. Take One Day At a Time.  Facing a big life change can be overwhelming.  You may be wondering what will happen with children, finances, property, other assets, common friends, relatives, etc.  Remember that those things will sort themselves out as things evolve and progress.  If you focus on taking one day at a time, trying to accomplish what is necessary to succeed in just that one day, and facing the problems and challenges that arise in just that day, then you’ll be better able to manage the stress of separation or divorce.
  3. Reach Out to Family and Friends.  One emotion many people struggle with in separation or divorce is a feeling of failure or shame, and consequently it’s common for people to shy away from family and friends during the separation or divorce process.  A different perspective may help you overcome those negative emotions.  Consider how many friends and associates you know that are divorced.  Look online to see the statistics on the success rates of relationships.  Take steps to reassure yourself that you are in good company if your marriage did not work out as hoped.  Reach out to family and friends because they love you and will support you through this difficult time.
  4. Talk About Your Feelings.  Throughout the separation or divorce period, you will likely be on a rollercoaster ride of emotions.  Anger, sadness, disappointment, relief, happiness, fear and every other emotion are likely to overcome you at different times in the process.  Take the time to open up to a trusted friend or family member to talk about how you feel.  Try to find someone who is not affiliated with your former spouse, so that you can feel that the person is entirely on your side.  You may want to be cautious of posting your feelings on social media or other public forums, but don’t miss the chance to discuss with a therapist, group, good friend, or family member.

 

  • Focus on a Bright Future.  Although seeing a bright future may be challenging right now, when you are grieving over what was lost, you may find benefit in sitting down and making a list of positive thoughts, goals, and feelings.  Consider a new hobby to take up. Think about dreams that were previously unfulfilled that may be an available opportunity now. Realize that the growth that you will experience through this challenge will make you a stronger, more empathetic person.

Separation and divorce are tough, but if you concentrate on taking care of yourself, living one day at a time, reaching out to family and friends, sharing feelings and focusing on a bright future, you will find that you can achieve greatness in this difficult time.

3 Things Most People Do Wrong After Getting a DUI

If you were just charged with DUI (Driving Under the Influence), then the last thing you want to do is make any more mistakes.  This article will explain what people often do wrong and what to remember to avoid those pitfalls.  

 

  • Mistake: Post to Social Media/Publicize to Friends.

 

Remember: “You have the right to remain silent.”

After getting a DUI, many people are fired up and furious.  Many feel that they were treated unfairly by the police or that there were extenuating circumstances in their case.  If you feel this way, you may be right, but you should exercise your right to remain silent even when you are not in custody.  Your public social media accounts are not the right place to post details about your arrest or charge, because anything posted publicly could potentially be used against you as an admission.  It is also a common mistake for people to tell friends or associates at work about the criminal charge.  While it may be therapeutic to share the story, it is often better not to share this information with friends or co-workers, as news often travels fast and there may be professional repercussions to you.  Remember, you are presumed innocent, so don’t let your own mouth get you into trouble before you have had your day in court.

 

  • Mistake:  Procrastinate.  

 

Remember:  “If you fail to plan, you plan to fail.”

Denial is real, and after getting a DUI many people want to forget about it and inadvertently lose track of details.  Some throw the paperwork in a drawer.  Others fail to find out when their administrative hearing is for the Driver’s License.  Many will put finding an attorney on their mental task list, but not follow through in taking that step.  The most important step you can take in your defense is the first one.  As the old adage says, you eat an elephant one bite at a time.  First, organize your paperwork.  Next, identify important dates:  When is your administrative hearing?  When is your first court date?  Third, decide on your legal defense:  Are you going to request a public defender?  Are you going to hire a private attorney?  

 

  • Mistake:  Have Another Run-In With the Law.   

 

Remember:  “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”

So you have a DUI.  It’s not good news, but it is manageable.  Even if it’s not your first DUI, you need to remain calm and focus on the future, not the past. The most important step you can take is to keep your nose clean and stay out of trouble.  The worst mistake you can make is to compound the DUI with subsequent criminal offenses.  It’s common for people to have problems after the DUI, so expect this from yourself and prepare for it.  Depression can push people back into an addiction cycle, where illegal drug use may be a problem.  Enlist the help of family members and friends to avoid anything that could lead to criminal offenses:  do not drink and drive, avoid situations that may erupt in domestic violence, beware of illegal drug use, do not drive if your license is suspended).  This is how you avoid the “big things,” but there are other small things you can do.  If you are a passenger, encourage the driver to obey traffic laws. Avoid situations or friend groups where illegal activities may be occurring, even if you aren’t participating.  The bottom line here is do everything you can to avoid getting charged with another crime.

 

 

 

 

Vacaville Legal Problems?  How David Knecht Law Can Help with Criminal Defense

Are you looking for the best criminal defense attorney in Vacaville?  Do you need the best DUI attorney in Vacaville?

The seasoned attorneys and staff at the Law Office of David Knecht have the experience, knowledge and gumption to fight for you no matter how small or serious your criminal charge may be.

 

  • David Knecht was a police officer and detective for over 13 years before becoming a lawyer, so he knows the system inside and out.
  • At David Knecht law we take the time to thoroughly analyze your case:  
  • to understand who you are, including your personal situation , past history, physical condition and every other factor that my help us to prepare your defense
  • to listen to what were the circumstances of the arrest, to analyze what was said and done, and look for weaknesses in the case against you
  • to discuss the police report, the police questions, the tests or procedures that may have been performed.
  • At David Knecht law, we have had successful outcomes in representing clients in a variety of type of cases
  • Looking for an attorney in Vacaville to represent you for a theft or fraud charge?  Mr. Knecht has represented clients accused of identity theft, possession of stolen property, fraudulent use of credit cards, grand theft, petty theft, auto theft, embezzlement and more.  You can trust that he has experience.
  • Looking for an attorney in Vacaville to represent you for assault and battery? Whether you are looking at assault with a deadly weapon, domestic violence, robbery, gun crimes, etc., Mr. Knecht will represent you with knowledge and confidence.  
  • Looking for an attorney in Vacaville to represent you for drug offenses?  Whether you are facing illegal possession or sale of cocaine, methamphetamine, marijuana, prescription drugs, Mr. Knecht understands these charges and how to defend them.
  • Looking for an attorney in Vacaville to represent you for sex offenses? Mr. Knecht’s experience working child and adult sexual assault cases gives him unique insight into these offenses and how to assist clients in seeking reduced or dismissed charges.   

 

Whether you are looking for an attorney to assist you in defending theft, fraud, assault and battery, possession of drugs, sale of drugs, DUI, or some other crime, look no further than David Knecht Law.

 

3 Reasons Smart People Hire a Lawyer After Getting a Criminal Charge

A criminal charge is likely to affect both your freedom and your bank account.  You may be aware that jail time is a possibility, but do you know how much jail time is common for your offense?  Do you know the fines typically involved?  Can you anticipate what counseling or classes might be involved?  

One thing you may not know is that even attorneys typically don’t represent themselves in criminal cases.  There is value in having someone else look at the facts and represent your interests. This article discusses why smart people hire a lawyer to represent them in a criminal case and how to best utilize your lawyer to defend you.

  1. Evidentiary Defenses.  If you are thinking that you are guilty because you did the thing that you are accused of, then you aren’t thinking like a lawyer.  Attorneys know that it is the government’s (city/county/etc.) burden to prove that you are guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.  Just because you did something doesn’t mean that the other side can prove it.  Furthermore, you have a right to be secure against unreasonable search and seizure.  How this translates to your criminal charge is that the police have to use legal means to stop you and search you.  If they fail to stop or search you properly, then the evidence that they find can’t be used against you.  At attorney knows these rules and can assist you with evidentiary defenses.  
  2. Plea Bargain.  If you are planning to enter a guilty plea, an attorney can help you get a fair plea bargain.  A lawyer who regularly practices criminal law in your jurisdiction will know what to ask the prosecutor for and what the best approach for that particular prosecutor is.  Often, jurisdictions have standard plea bargains, so you will want to be represented by someone who knows what those are and can ask for at least that bargain or better.
  3. Confidence.  Hiring an attorney will give you confidence and prepare you for what will happen.  The legal system is complicated, and you will benefit from having an experienced guide to help you navigate the system.  Your attorney will know what needs to be done and how to do it.  He or she will stand by you if you enter a plea or face the court to receive a sentence.  Your attorney can speak to the Court on your behalf, so that the right things are said.   

Evidentiary defenses, plea bargaining, and imbuing you with confidence are just a few areas where an attorney can provide value.  Be sure to ask your attorney questions, be proactive in assisting your attorney to develop a strong defense for you, and follow the advice of your counsel.  

Thinking About Getting a Divorce?  10 Essential Steps for Planning Ahead

If you are considering a divorce, it never hurts to plan ahead. Read below for the 10 essential steps you won’t want to miss in preparing for divorce.

  1. Document everything you can find about money coming in or out from your spouse’s side.  If you are in the dark about your spouse’s sources of income or the amounts, start nailing that information down.  Pay attention to anything your spouse tells you about income or debt, and document that information with screen shots if possible.  Check your credit card statements.  Find out about employer benefits that your spouse may have, such as 401K or HSA accounts.  Think outside the box to assets your spouse may hold that may not be as obvious, such as a large number of frequent flyer miles or a side business with his or her family that brings in a certain income.  
  2. Get organized about money coming in or out from you own side.  You likely have a general idea about your own income and debts, but you will want to save that information in an organized manner.  Do you know where your tax information is?  Refresh your records on your savings accounts, investment accounts, etc.  
  3. Prepare your information in a place that will be easy to access after the divorce.  After you have documented information about your collective finances, you need to save it in a place that will be easily accessible, such as your workplace or in the possession of a family member.  Even where both parties are civil, keeping this information in a neutral place will avoid the potential for uncomfortable situations.
  4. Get property valued before the divorce.  Getting a valuation of property may be valuable down the road, but your ability to do or the value in this information highly depends on the types of assets involved and their value.  Some ideas to consider include:  Taking the ring into a local jewelry store for assessment.  Asking a car dealership the trade in value of your vehicles. Obtaining an appraisal of the home.
  5. Update your job resume before filing.  If your spouse provides the financial support for your family, you may want to consider getting additional job training or education before filing.  You may not end up receiving as much support from your ex-spouse as you need, so being able to step into the job market will empower you.
  6. Look at the date you are planning to file.  The timing of your divorce can be important in some cases.  Is your spouse expecting a large bonus or promotion soon?  Do you have a large financial obligation pending, such as a house under contract as buyer or seller?  Is one of your children approaching their 18th birthday?  Consider everything before deciding when to pull the plug.
  7. Plan ahead for health insurance.  If your insurance is through your spouse’s employer, you may want to see what other health insurance options will be available to you.  You may be able to find options that are less expensive or you may be able to find employment where you can get health insurance benefits on your own.
  8. Consider what you value most.  It’s a good idea to think ahead and decide what you value most and what you want to fight for, so that you can advise your attorney on what success looks like for you in the divorce.  Do you want to stay in the family home?  Do you care about the timeshare?  Think ahead logically.  One mistake often made in divorce is that the parties get caught up in the anger and spite and spend a lot of money on an issue that they don’t care about that much.  Before the fireworks start, think about what you must have and what you can give up.
  9. Don’t assume that something is your because it is in your name. You may think that because an asset is in your name that it can’t be divided up in the divorce, but that often is not the case.  When you are looking at your financial landscape, consider that assets and liabilities are likely to be taken into account regardless of the superficial designation of ownership.
  10. Seek professional advice.  Even if you haven’t decided for sure whether you want to leave the marriage, you can seek advice from an attorney on how to plan ahead financially in the event that divorce is the right decision for you.  

Never Do These 5 Things after Being Charged with a DUI

If you’ve been charged with a DUI, you certainly have many worries and concerns about what you should and shouldn’t do.  This article will walk you through a list of actions you should avoid at this critical time, so that you can be in the best position to resolve your case as favorably as possible.   

    1. Don’t panic or give up.  A DUI can be one of the most stressful events in your life, so it’s understandable that you might panic or want to give up on all the good things you are doing in your life, like work or fulfilling family responsibilities.  Hire a great attorney as soon as possible and let your attorney guide you through this experience.  Ask your attorney a lot of questions, so that you understand the process. Don’t berate yourself for what can’t be changed and focus on problem solving in the future.

 

  • Don’t delay in hiring an attorney.  Don’t delay in hiring your attorney because you will have a DMV hearing typically prior to the resolution of your DUI case in court. After an arrest for DUI, the officer is required by law to immediately forward a copy of the notice of suspension or revocation form and any driver license taken into possession to the DMV.  The DMV automatically conducts an administrative review that includes an examination of the officer’s report, the suspension or revocation order, and any test results.  You have the right to request a hearing from the DMV within 10 days of receipt of the suspension or revocation order, and your attorney can assist you in the DMV hearing.
  • Don’t drive on a suspended or revoked license, don’t get another DUI, and don’t commit any other crimes.  Although it seems fairly obvious that you shouldn’t drive on a suspended or revoked license or commit any other crimes, it is somewhat common for defendants to slip up in this area.  This is a risk you do not want to take.  The penalties are enhanced for subsequent DUI offenses.  Plan ahead.  Look at public transportation or find someone to drive you to work so that you don’t get in a situation where you feel forced to drive on a suspended or revoked license.  If you are attending an event or party, make sure that your keys are safely out of your reach and that you are prepared to take a cab or Uber.  Discuss with your attorney and your family the strategies you will employ to avoid getting in trouble.
  • Don’t post publicly on Facebook or Social Media.  Consider changing your public social media accounts to private.  Do you have pictures of yourself with a drink in hand on the night you were arrested for the DUI?  You can’t destroy or delete evidence, but you are not under obligation to keep your social media account public.  Also, refrain from posting any new information about the DUI. Consult with your attorney about information on your social media accounts, as he or she will be in the best position to advise you how pictures or posts may impact your case.
  • Don’t forget to write down what happened right away.  Your memory is best when it’s fresh, so take the time right after your DUI to sit down and write everything you can remember:
  • When, where, and how were you stopped?
  • What did the officer say when he stopped you?  
  • What did you tell the officer?
  • What type of tests did you do?
  • How did you perform on those tests?
  • Was a breath test administered?  Where, when and how?
  • Was there anything that impacted the tests?  busy traffic, health impediments, etc.

 

In sum:  The most important step you need to take right now is to relax and look to building your case by finding a good attorney as soon as possible, avoiding escalating your problems with other offenses, being aware of your public posts, and recording your recollections as soon as possible to assist your attorney in providing an excellent defense for you.

 

How to Take Charge of Your Custody Battle Without Losing Your Mind

If you are like most parents, your kids are the most important people in your life.  They are adorable and irreplaceable, and you would do anything for them.  If you are going to battle with an itinerant ex-spouse to determine the fate of your precious ones, then you need every arrow in your quiver possible.  This guide will help you understand the what you need to do to be successful in a custody battle.

  1. Understand the rules of the game.  Courts have broad discretion to protect the best interest of the children, which includes each child’s health, safety, education and general welfare.  Courts can take into account any number of factors such as the following:

 

  • evidence of abuse or neglect,
  • the age of the child
  • sibling relationships
  • degree of attachment between parent and child

 

Courts cannot take into account the gender or race of the parent.  One parent’s financial ability can’t be the sole factor in a custody decision. 

 

  • Be your best self.  During a custody battle, you actions and the words that come out of your mouth will be under a microscope.  Be careful of the way you behave with the ex-spouse and also with the children.  It goes without saying that any type of threatening or violent behavior should not occur, but also you should proactively behave as if the judge were observing you at all times.  Speak courteously to the ex.  Try not to take unreasonable positions. When you are with your child, give them your quality time.  If there are ways you can make yourself a better parent through overcoming addictions or seeking more education, look to improving yourself as a parent.  Taking the high road is not only the right thing to do, but it will give you an edge in getting the custody you seek.

 

  • Pinpoint Areas of disagreement with the ex-spouse.  In any legal case, you need to put yourself in the shoes of the opposing party.  Don’t just get frustrated with what they do, but look deeper to try to understand why.  If you can get to the why, then you will be one step closer to finding a resolution that will be acceptable to both parties.  If the issue is unresolvable, then by understanding your ex, you will be better able to fight them in court.  For example, if your ex-spouse wants a different schedule, look at why he or she is taking that position?  Is there a work schedule reason?  Is there a grandparent or otherwise, whose schedule is playing into your spouse’s mindset?  If you can get beneath the surface to understand your opponent’s arguments, then you have a better chance of a successful outcome.

 

  • Gather evidence and document everything.  Your word that the other person is a bad parent is not as convincing as solid evidence.  If a child care worker, neighbor, teacher has observed your ex-spouse abusing or mistreating the child, then have them document that observation.  Consult with your attorney on the best way to preserve this evidence, but don’t pass up the opportunity to memorialize important evidence. If your spouse has sent you malicious emails, organize those in a file for your attorney.  If your spouse has posted damaging comments on social media, screen shot that information and share it with your attorney.  It takes extra work to be organized and document everything, but in many cases that time in preparation pays off.

 

  • Consult with professionals.  If you feel your children are suffering from the custody battle, don’t hesitate to get them counseling.  If you need someone to talk to, turn to a trusted friend, look into community resources for counseling, or find a professional counselor who can help you.  It’s not uncommon to have a high stress level during a custody battle, and you can seek help.  Hire an attorney that you trust and who will be zealous in advocating your interests.

 

 

3 Ways You Can Help Yourself in Your Upcoming Divorce Hearing

Whether you have an attorney or are representing yourself, you want to be prepared to have the best possible outcome in any divorce hearing.  This article will discuss three steps that are always important in preparing for any court appearance:

1. Know Your Goal.   You need to understand what the purpose of the hearing is and clearly identify your goal for the proceeding. Emotions often run strong during a divorce, and sadness and anger are almost inevitably going to occupy the minds of both parties and take your focus away from getting what you want. To achieve a successful outcome, you need to think through your strategy:  

  • What options are likely to be an outcome of this hearing?
  • How does this hearing play into your overall strategy for getting what you want in the divorce?
  • What would a third party consider fair?

If you have a good idea of what will be accomplished in this hearing, then you can do your part to keep on track and laser focused to achieving your ends.

2. Get Organized.  Your anxiety will be less if you know when and where you need to be in court and what will happen.  Leave plenty of time to get there.  Arrange for child care in advance if you have children. If your attorney has requested any documents, get them to him or her well in advance of the hearing date.  If you are representing yourself, make sure you have identified what you need and bring several copies of each document. Here’s a short checklist:

 3. Look and Behave Professionally.  Impressions are very important, and even if you are represented by counsel, you want to look and act professionally. The judge and/or staff will make unconscious judgments of your clothing, appearance and demeanor. Wear attire that would be presentable for a business or business casual setting and something you feel comfortable in. Be wary of showing any hostile gestures: speak calmly and avoid glaring or sarcastic looks.  

Knowing your goal, getting organized and looking and behaving professionally are simple tips that are easy to implement, but they will help you succeed in having a great outcome at your hearing.  

 

5 Things Most People Do Wrong When Selecting an Attorney

You know that your decision about legal representation is very important not only for the outcome of your case, but for your emotional and mental well-being in the process.  In your quest to find the best person for the best price, make sure that you don’t fall into these 5 pitfalls of mistakes people often make when selecting an attorney:

 

  • Not asking Enough Questions

 

People often fall into one of two categories:  Either they are a little intimidated by the legal system and afraid to ask questions, or they want to appear confident and knowledgeable, and so they don’t reach out with questions.  Don’t fall into this trap.  You need to ask questions, take notes, and make sure you understand every aspect of your legal representation.  Remember to ask:

  • Who will be handling my case?
    • The partner or an associate?
  • What experience does this attorney have in this particular case?
  • Would you consider it a complex or simple case?
  • How will I be billed?
  • Can you estimate the cost of this matter?
  • What is the most effective and cost efficient way to communicate with my attorney?
    • Phone calls, emails, coordinating with staff?
  • What evidence will need to be preserved and how should I preserve it?  

 

 

  • Failing to Examine Other Clients’ Results

 

Each case is unique, and a good outcome for another client doesn’t necessarily guarantee a great outcome for you because the facts and circumstances are different.  However, it is important to see what results other clients had to give you an idea of the level of experience an attorney has, and how satisfied other clients were with the representation.  A great firm will often post these results on their own website.  (See for example, http://www.davidknechtlaw.com/results/).  

  1. Not researching the practice areas of the potential attorney.  

In medicine, people are generally aware that you should find the right specialist – for example, you wouldn’t go to a podiatrist for brain surgery. You should certainly consider the practice areas of the attorneys you are considering.  Many attorneys will list their practice areas on their website.  (See for example, http://www.davidknechtlaw.com/practice-areas/).  If an attorney doesn’t list practice areas, you should ask how many cases of your type that attorney has handled.  You should be wary of attorney who is reluctant to identify practice areas because their reluctance may indicate a lack of experience in any one area.

  1. Skipping over the references.

It is surprising how many people hire an attorney without checking references.  You can use social media to crowd source the answer.  Some people post on Facebook asking for recommendations.  Others contact friends directly who have faced similar legal issues for advice.  If you are reluctant to make your search for an attorney public, another good sources of reference is the attorney himself/herself.  You can check the website.  (See for example, http://www.davidknechtlaw.com/testimonials/).  You can also ask the attorney if they would feel comfortable having you talk to a previous client.  Do your homework, and don’t forget references.

 

  • Choosing based only on cost.

 

While cost is a factor in your decision-making process, it should not be the only factor.  Some people are tempted to go with the cheapest attorney, only to find out that the bill adds up.  Others go with the most expensive attorney, assuming that cost correlates with successful outcomes.  The reality is that cost should be a consideration, but the attorney’s reputation, references, and experience should all weigh into your final determination as to who is best for you.

 

Looking for the Right Vacaville Attorney?  3 Reasons to Give Us a Call

At the Law Offices of David W. Knecht, we focus our practice on Family Law (including Divorce, Child Custody, Child Support), Criminal Law (including Juvenile Court, DUI), and Estate Planning (including Wills, Living Trusts, Durable Powers of Attorney, and Advance Health Care Directives).  Why choose us for your most important legal needs?

1. Your family is important to us. Born and raised in California, David. W. Knecht has been serving and protecting Californian’s for over thirty years. He is invested in the community and cares about each individual client. You will not be lost in the hands of a brand new associate or paralegal staff. You can expect a meeting with an experienced attorney personally to discuss the possible outcomes of your case. In developing legal strategy, we are mindful of offering cost-effective legal solutions. We maintain close communication with clients concerning legal expensive and counsel clients on less costly alternative means. Our mission is clear:  fight for you, be available to you, seek the most efficient course of action, and serve you.                                                                                                                              

2. We know the system. Mr. Knecht has a background that gives him unique insight into the legal system.  

  • We know the law enforcement system:  Mr. Knecht worked as a police officer and detective for the cities of Fullerton, Santa Rosa and Vacaville for 13 years.  
  • We know the judicial system: While still in law school, Mr. Knecht worked as a law clerk for attorney Robert C. Fracchia in Vacaville and attorney Daniel J. Healy in Vallejo. Both Judge Fracchia and Judge Healy are now sitting judges in the Solano County Superior Court. After graduating from law school and passing the bar exam, Mr. Knecht worked for attorney E. Bradley Nelson in Vacaville. Judge Nelson is now a sitting judge in the Solano County Superior Court.
  • We know the legal system. Mr. Knecht has been in practice for over 10 years, and has represented thousands of clients in estate planning, family law, trust and will litigation, criminal defense, restraining orders, and other matters since opening his own office in Vacaville, California in 2007.

3. Experience matters.  You’ll want an attorney who has the experience to answer your questions and guide you to a favorable outcome:

  • Family Law. We understand the stress that family law matters can place on your loved ones and finances. We conduct ourselves professionally to minimize conflict, we seek solutions that are in the best interest of the children, and we help our clients set appropriate but firm boundaries. We remain focused on practical matters and advise you based on our experience of helping hundreds of other families.
  • Criminal Law. Mr. Knecht defends juveniles and adults accused in the Solano County, Napa County, and Yolo County Superior Courts of all felony, misdemeanor, DUI and other criminal offenses. He has represented over 400 criminal defendants in the last three years alone. He has an excellent record of success and is focused on getting the results you need. You can depend on him to fight for you every step of the way.
  • Estate Planning. We understand that you’ve worked a lifetime to acquire wealth and protecting and preserving your assets is important for you and your family. Mr. Knecht helps trustees and executors administer trusts and probates, and he will spend time with you explaining the process and tasks involved in successfully administering a trust or probate estate. For wills and revocable trusts, Mr. Knecht will meet with you to discuss your situation and whether or not a revocable or living trust is right for you to achieve goals including probate avoidance, federal estate tax minimization, and greater flexibility in creating distribution plans for specific beneficiaries.   

Give us a call today to find out how we can help you with your divorce, DUI, estate planning, or other legal needs.  We will listen to you, answer your questions, and provide high quality, experienced representation for your case.