3 Ways You Know You Need to Find a New Lawyer

Did you hire an attorney to represent you, and now you are having second thoughts?  Are you wondering how to know if you hired the wrong person?  Here are things to look for when deciding whether you should break ties and find someone new to represent you.  Before you switch attorneys, however, you should always inquire into the retainer and billing and how that change may impact the cost of your case.

1. You Are Not A Priority to This Attorney.  We all know that attorneys have a roster of clients, but every case should be handled with diligence and care.  Take a look at how serious the problem is.  If your attorney is missing hearings or deadlines, then you probably need someone new.  If he or she is consistently late to court, then that is something also to look at.  If your calls or emails are not being returned, then your attorney is not fulfilling their responsibility to communicate with you.  If your attorney talks down to you or pressures you to make a decision you aren’t comfortable with, then those are also signs that you and your attorney may not be a good team.  

2. Your Attorney Doesn’t Know What He or She Is Doing. Even if you were referred to your attorney by a friend or if they are an acquaintance, the relationship is a business one. You have to look out for yourself and make sure that you are being represented by someone who is competent to represent you in this type of case.  Signs to look for:

  • Does your attorney seem to know the system?

Can he or she give you an overview of each step or hearing in your case and what will take place?

  • Does your attorney appear confident?  

Trust your instincts about the level of confidence your attorney displays.   Confidence doesn’t equal competence, but it is one indicator of whether this is your attorney’s first case of this type or 10000th.

  • Does your attorney answer questions?

If your attorney is knowledgeable, he or she will not shy away from questions, but rather, encourage you to ask about anything you don’t know or understand.

Does your attorney know the people?  

Does your attorney seem familiar with other attorneys, court staff, counselors, etc. Professional affiliations are another clue to experience.

3. You can’t Afford Your Attorney. This is a tricky one because the value you get from an attorney is difficult to quantify.  Any attorney is going to be a strain on your budget because divorce, adoption, criminal defense, and so forth are expenses that are unusual and will seem high.  So, the financial discomfort of any attorney is a given and you want someone who is good, which doesn’t come free.  However, some attorneys are better salesmen than lawyers.  Some bill for things that may not be necessary.  Here are some things to look for when deciding if the cost is prohibitive:

  • Are you comfortable with the billing approach?  Would you prefer a flat fee for your case?  Do you prefer hourly?
  • Do you understand the fees and do you understand how to maximize your value? For example, if your attorney bills you a flat fee for every email they read from you, then you may want to consolidate all questions into a short email.  As another example, is your attorney “chatty” such that a phone call will cost you a lot more than email exchanges or is your attorney a bit of a slow writer, such that a call will resolve issues faster than email.  
  • At the end of the day, do you feel like you are getting the full value out of your representation?

Your decision on legal representation should not be taken lightly, as the outcome of your case will impact your life for years to come.  There is no easy answer to whether you should make a change, but the factors to be considered certainly include whether your counsel is giving you the attention you deserve, whether they are competent to represent you in this type of case, and whether you will be able to pay the bill when it’s all said and done.

5 Things Most People Don’t Know About Finding the Perfect Family Lawyer

The perfect family lawyer is the person who best fits with you, your goals, and your case, and it’s worth taking the time to find the best fit.  This article will discuss the steps to narrowing the field to the best family lawyer for you.

1. Look at What and Where.  Family law is a general term for a practice that typically includes divorce, custody, child support, visitation, alimony/spousal support, adoption, pre-nuptial agreements, and more. If you want to find the perfect family lawyer, you first need to identify what type of case you have.  One of the first questions you will want to ask your potential attorney is whether they practice where the case will be filed. Typically your case will be litigated where either you or your spouse live, but there are exceptions, so ask up front whether you are looking for an attorney in the right place.  

2. Research Whether Your Potential Choice Specializes in Family Law.  You need to do the work to find the best family lawyer, and you have many tools at your fingertips.

  • Check the Attorney’s Website.  Click the links on the attorney’s website.  Does the attorney list family law as one of his or her specialties?
  • Ask Your Attorney Questions about Their Experience in Family Law.   Ask as many questions as you can think of, such as how long they have been practicing family law, what types of outcomes they have had in cases similar to yours, what style they practice (whether adversarial or more conciliatory), and what your expectations should be.

3. Do a Reputation Check.   Ask friends and family for a recommendation, since word of mouth can be one of the best ways to hear whether an attorney is good or bad.  Check the Better Business Bureau website to make sure that your potential choice doesn’t have any complaints.  Look at the online reviews to see whether others had a good experience.

4. Talk About the Money.  Some clients feel reluctant to talk about the billing, but this should be done right up front.  Many attorneys require a retainer, which is a fee paid at the beginning of your case, but that amount isn’t the only number you need to know to make an informed decision.  Ask which attorney will work on your case and why.  With some firms, the same person will be working on your case exclusively and for the duration.  With other firms, you may communicate with a partner, but an associate (less experienced attorney) will be doing much of the work.  Find out in advance who will be doing what, and make sure you are comfortable with it.  Make sure that you will get back any portion of the retainer that isn’t used. When your bills come, look at them carefully, and don’t be afraid to question a charge that seems unreasonable.

5. Consult with More than One Attorney.  Some people feel obligated to an attorney after an initial consultation, but it’s a mistake not to shop around to your top few choices.  Trust your impressions. Go to your initial consultation prepared.  Ask questions.  Take notes.  Give yourself time to make the decision and don’t feel rushed, and you will gravitate to the person who is the best fit for you and your needs.

Don’t let your search for an attorney overwhelm you.  Finding the best family lawyer is not so different from finding the right home, or a great car or your favorite technology.  By following the guidelines above you can identify what you need, do the necessary research, and finally make a well-founded decision on whether that person is the right fit for you.

What Makes the Law Offices of David Knecht Different From Other Vacaville Lawyers

If you are looking for a firm that understands the legal system in Vacaville and the surrounding areas, who is committed to our clients’ success, who has the experience and knowledge to represent you effectively and vigorously, then look no further than the Law Offices of David Knecht.   We have a focused practice to serve you in family law, criminal defense or estate planning, and we have a track record of successful outcomes for our clients.  Please learn more about the services we can offer you:

  1. Vacaville Is Home.  Our office is located in the heart of Vacaville at 500 Main. We serve clients in Vacaville, Fairfield, Dixon, Suisun City, Winters and the Solano County Superior Courts. We are familiar with the law enforcement agencies, judges, and legal community in this area.  We understand the system and will help you navigate it wisely.
  2. We Are Committed to the Long-Term Satisfaction of Our Clients.  Since this is our home, we are not just looking for a quick buck, but we are committed to the long-term satisfaction of our clients and to building the community with excellent legal representation of each individual one. Mr. Knecht was born and raised in California, and he has been serving and protecting Californian’s for over 30 years.   He worked as a police officer and detective in Fullerton, Santa Rosa and Vacaville for over 13 years.  He has continued the tradition of service in his legal practice, focusing on family, wills and trusts, probate and trust administration for over a decade.
  3. Experience, experience, and more experience.   Mr. Knecht has extensive legal experience to represent you with confidence in all the roles that an attorney plays as an advisor, advocate, negotiator, and litigator.  Having been a police officer, a law clerk for judges, and for many years a partner in his own firm, he has represented thousands of clients in estate planning, family law, trust and will litigation, criminal defense, restraining orders and other matters.  He has been the recipient of many awards, achievements and memberships, including the Distinguished Service Award from the City of Santa Rosa for leadership and sustained excellence and admission into the Member of Barristers for the Solano County Criminal Defense Bar Association.
  4. Focused Practice.  At the Law Offices of David Knecht, we don’t try to be jack of all trades, but master of none.  We have focused our practice and honed our experience to understand and serve clients in the specific areas of family law, wills and trusts, probate and trust administration.  
  5. Our Results Speak for Themselves.  Mr. Knecht has had a long history of obtaining successful outcomes for his clients.  Just a few of the past achievements include a family law trial where Mr. Knecht’s client was awarded retroactive child support and over $50,000 in attorney’s fees, a DUI where the charge was reduced to a Wet Reckless with no license suspension, and a Felony Assault Case where the crimes were reduced to a misdemeanor.  While the facts of each case are unique and no one can guarantee the results, the track record of the Law Offices of David Knecht show a consistent pattern of passion, hard work, expertise and diligence in providing legal representation.

 

 

 

3 Ways to Be the Perfect Criminal Defendant

Help me, help you.”  It’s the famous line from Jerry Maguire, and it applies to anyone facing criminal charges and their attorney.  How can you help your attorney help you?  

1. Communicate.  Good communication is key to helping your attorney help you.  It comes into play throughout your case.

  • Phone/Email/In Person.  Find out how your attorney prefers to consult with you, whether it’s email, phone or in person.  Be available.  Respond to messages promptly.  Don’t underestimate the importance of following up.
  • Be Clear.  Try to organize yourself so that your story is consistent and organized.  This will help your attorney present your case and will help you be believable in the very unlikely event you end up on the witness stand.  When you communicate with your attorney about the facts, try to have the dates handy.  Remember details.  Think through step by step what happened.  
  • Be Assertive.  It’s important to communicate with your counsel about your desired outcome.  For example, if you want to fight the case, then let your attorney know.  If you would prefer to enter a plea, then help him not only understand you preference, but also the details, such as if you want to do your jail time on a specific weekend, or if you need payments for your fines, or if you prefer a certain type of counseling, etc.  Your attorney may be able to ask the judge for special accommodations, but only if he or she knows what to ask for.  

2. Be Levelheaded.  Your behavior on and off the “court” can make or break your case, so be aware of how you are presenting yourself.

  • Be Collected.  Nothing can fire you up more than an unjust cause, so it makes perfect sense that you may get angry or frustrated when speaking about what happened.  Anger or frustration directed to your attorney is misdirected will only get in the way of their vigorous representation to help you.  Be assertive in telling your attorney what you want or need, but do not be aggressive with the person who is on your side.  
  • Assume the Judge or Court Staff Are Watching Anytime You Are in the Vicinity of Court.  Another aspect of being level headed is behaving as if you are always being observed when you are on the premises of the Court.  The worst thing you can do for your case is to blow up with one of the Judge’s staff, as this will often be reported back to the Judge.  Judges are human and may hold your behavior against you.  Additionally, make sure that you are in compliance with all restrictions when going to Court.  For example, if your license has been revoked, do not drive to the courthouse.  If you are prohibited from contacting a certain person, do not go with them in the same vehicle to the Court.  

 

  • Be Honest with Your Attorney.  Your attorney may or may not want to know if you believe you are guilty of the offense, but your counsel needs to know any information that is likely to be in any records, in witness testimony, etc.  

 

  • Don’t Hang Your Attorney Out to Dry.  Surprises are not welcomed by most criminal defense attorneys.  If you know about a witness, or a test result, or a piece of evidence such as a text, let your attorney know.  Some defendants are embarrassed to tell their attorney that they did something that wasn’t the smartest, such as an admission to an officer or a confession to a friend.  Your attorney is a professional and only has your best interest in mind.

 

With great communication, staying level-headed, and being honest with your attorney about adverse facts, you can help your attorney help you as much as possible.

 

How to Help Yourself When Dealing with an Ugly Divorce

Whether you were married a short time or for forever, whether you have kids or no kids, there is no easy divorce.  The end of a marriage is emotionally challenging for all parties involved.  If you have a spiteful spouse or a challenging custody situation, then the emotional toll can be even greater.  This article will give 5 tips on how to help yourself handle the emotional, financial, and physical trauma of an ugly divorce:

  1. Focus on Yourself.  When you are going through a separation or divorce, you need to give yourself permission to focus on you and what can best meet your needs.  This means something different for each individual.  For some, it may mean taking time to get outside and reconnect with nature.  For others, spending the time and money on massage or manicure may be therapeutic.  You may be in a place where you just want to lie in bed and be sad and do nothing.  You need to allow yourself to grieve in your own way.
  2. Take One Day At a Time.  Facing a big life change can be overwhelming.  You may be wondering what will happen with children, finances, property, other assets, common friends, relatives, etc.  Remember that those things will sort themselves out as things evolve and progress.  If you focus on taking one day at a time, trying to accomplish what is necessary to succeed in just that one day, and facing the problems and challenges that arise in just that day, then you’ll be better able to manage the stress of separation or divorce.
  3. Reach Out to Family and Friends.  One emotion many people struggle with in separation or divorce is a feeling of failure or shame, and consequently it’s common for people to shy away from family and friends during the separation or divorce process.  A different perspective may help you overcome those negative emotions.  Consider how many friends and associates you know that are divorced.  Look online to see the statistics on the success rates of relationships.  Take steps to reassure yourself that you are in good company if your marriage did not work out as hoped.  Reach out to family and friends because they love you and will support you through this difficult time.
  4. Talk About Your Feelings.  Throughout the separation or divorce period, you will likely be on a rollercoaster ride of emotions.  Anger, sadness, disappointment, relief, happiness, fear and every other emotion are likely to overcome you at different times in the process.  Take the time to open up to a trusted friend or family member to talk about how you feel.  Try to find someone who is not affiliated with your former spouse, so that you can feel that the person is entirely on your side.  You may want to be cautious of posting your feelings on social media or other public forums, but don’t miss the chance to discuss with a therapist, group, good friend, or family member.

 

  • Focus on a Bright Future.  Although seeing a bright future may be challenging right now, when you are grieving over what was lost, you may find benefit in sitting down and making a list of positive thoughts, goals, and feelings.  Consider a new hobby to take up. Think about dreams that were previously unfulfilled that may be an available opportunity now. Realize that the growth that you will experience through this challenge will make you a stronger, more empathetic person.

Separation and divorce are tough, but if you concentrate on taking care of yourself, living one day at a time, reaching out to family and friends, sharing feelings and focusing on a bright future, you will find that you can achieve greatness in this difficult time.

3 Things Most People Do Wrong After Getting a DUI

If you were just charged with DUI (Driving Under the Influence), then the last thing you want to do is make any more mistakes.  This article will explain what people often do wrong and what to remember to avoid those pitfalls.  

 

  • Mistake: Post to Social Media/Publicize to Friends.

 

Remember: “You have the right to remain silent.”

After getting a DUI, many people are fired up and furious.  Many feel that they were treated unfairly by the police or that there were extenuating circumstances in their case.  If you feel this way, you may be right, but you should exercise your right to remain silent even when you are not in custody.  Your public social media accounts are not the right place to post details about your arrest or charge, because anything posted publicly could potentially be used against you as an admission.  It is also a common mistake for people to tell friends or associates at work about the criminal charge.  While it may be therapeutic to share the story, it is often better not to share this information with friends or co-workers, as news often travels fast and there may be professional repercussions to you.  Remember, you are presumed innocent, so don’t let your own mouth get you into trouble before you have had your day in court.

 

  • Mistake:  Procrastinate.  

 

Remember:  “If you fail to plan, you plan to fail.”

Denial is real, and after getting a DUI many people want to forget about it and inadvertently lose track of details.  Some throw the paperwork in a drawer.  Others fail to find out when their administrative hearing is for the Driver’s License.  Many will put finding an attorney on their mental task list, but not follow through in taking that step.  The most important step you can take in your defense is the first one.  As the old adage says, you eat an elephant one bite at a time.  First, organize your paperwork.  Next, identify important dates:  When is your administrative hearing?  When is your first court date?  Third, decide on your legal defense:  Are you going to request a public defender?  Are you going to hire a private attorney?  

 

  • Mistake:  Have Another Run-In With the Law.   

 

Remember:  “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”

So you have a DUI.  It’s not good news, but it is manageable.  Even if it’s not your first DUI, you need to remain calm and focus on the future, not the past. The most important step you can take is to keep your nose clean and stay out of trouble.  The worst mistake you can make is to compound the DUI with subsequent criminal offenses.  It’s common for people to have problems after the DUI, so expect this from yourself and prepare for it.  Depression can push people back into an addiction cycle, where illegal drug use may be a problem.  Enlist the help of family members and friends to avoid anything that could lead to criminal offenses:  do not drink and drive, avoid situations that may erupt in domestic violence, beware of illegal drug use, do not drive if your license is suspended).  This is how you avoid the “big things,” but there are other small things you can do.  If you are a passenger, encourage the driver to obey traffic laws. Avoid situations or friend groups where illegal activities may be occurring, even if you aren’t participating.  The bottom line here is do everything you can to avoid getting charged with another crime.

 

 

 

 

Vacaville Legal Problems?  How David Knecht Law Can Help with Criminal Defense

Are you looking for the best criminal defense attorney in Vacaville?  Do you need the best DUI attorney in Vacaville?

The seasoned attorneys and staff at the Law Office of David Knecht have the experience, knowledge and gumption to fight for you no matter how small or serious your criminal charge may be.

 

  • David Knecht was a police officer and detective for over 13 years before becoming a lawyer, so he knows the system inside and out.
  • At David Knecht law we take the time to thoroughly analyze your case:  
  • to understand who you are, including your personal situation , past history, physical condition and every other factor that my help us to prepare your defense
  • to listen to what were the circumstances of the arrest, to analyze what was said and done, and look for weaknesses in the case against you
  • to discuss the police report, the police questions, the tests or procedures that may have been performed.
  • At David Knecht law, we have had successful outcomes in representing clients in a variety of type of cases
  • Looking for an attorney in Vacaville to represent you for a theft or fraud charge?  Mr. Knecht has represented clients accused of identity theft, possession of stolen property, fraudulent use of credit cards, grand theft, petty theft, auto theft, embezzlement and more.  You can trust that he has experience.
  • Looking for an attorney in Vacaville to represent you for assault and battery? Whether you are looking at assault with a deadly weapon, domestic violence, robbery, gun crimes, etc., Mr. Knecht will represent you with knowledge and confidence.  
  • Looking for an attorney in Vacaville to represent you for drug offenses?  Whether you are facing illegal possession or sale of cocaine, methamphetamine, marijuana, prescription drugs, Mr. Knecht understands these charges and how to defend them.
  • Looking for an attorney in Vacaville to represent you for sex offenses? Mr. Knecht’s experience working child and adult sexual assault cases gives him unique insight into these offenses and how to assist clients in seeking reduced or dismissed charges.   

 

Whether you are looking for an attorney to assist you in defending theft, fraud, assault and battery, possession of drugs, sale of drugs, DUI, or some other crime, look no further than David Knecht Law.

 

3 Reasons Smart People Hire a Lawyer After Getting a Criminal Charge

A criminal charge is likely to affect both your freedom and your bank account.  You may be aware that jail time is a possibility, but do you know how much jail time is common for your offense?  Do you know the fines typically involved?  Can you anticipate what counseling or classes might be involved?  

One thing you may not know is that even attorneys typically don’t represent themselves in criminal cases.  There is value in having someone else look at the facts and represent your interests. This article discusses why smart people hire a lawyer to represent them in a criminal case and how to best utilize your lawyer to defend you.

  1. Evidentiary Defenses.  If you are thinking that you are guilty because you did the thing that you are accused of, then you aren’t thinking like a lawyer.  Attorneys know that it is the government’s (city/county/etc.) burden to prove that you are guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.  Just because you did something doesn’t mean that the other side can prove it.  Furthermore, you have a right to be secure against unreasonable search and seizure.  How this translates to your criminal charge is that the police have to use legal means to stop you and search you.  If they fail to stop or search you properly, then the evidence that they find can’t be used against you.  At attorney knows these rules and can assist you with evidentiary defenses.  
  2. Plea Bargain.  If you are planning to enter a guilty plea, an attorney can help you get a fair plea bargain.  A lawyer who regularly practices criminal law in your jurisdiction will know what to ask the prosecutor for and what the best approach for that particular prosecutor is.  Often, jurisdictions have standard plea bargains, so you will want to be represented by someone who knows what those are and can ask for at least that bargain or better.
  3. Confidence.  Hiring an attorney will give you confidence and prepare you for what will happen.  The legal system is complicated, and you will benefit from having an experienced guide to help you navigate the system.  Your attorney will know what needs to be done and how to do it.  He or she will stand by you if you enter a plea or face the court to receive a sentence.  Your attorney can speak to the Court on your behalf, so that the right things are said.   

Evidentiary defenses, plea bargaining, and imbuing you with confidence are just a few areas where an attorney can provide value.  Be sure to ask your attorney questions, be proactive in assisting your attorney to develop a strong defense for you, and follow the advice of your counsel.  

Thinking About Getting a Divorce?  10 Essential Steps for Planning Ahead

If you are considering a divorce, it never hurts to plan ahead. Read below for the 10 essential steps you won’t want to miss in preparing for divorce.

  1. Document everything you can find about money coming in or out from your spouse’s side.  If you are in the dark about your spouse’s sources of income or the amounts, start nailing that information down.  Pay attention to anything your spouse tells you about income or debt, and document that information with screen shots if possible.  Check your credit card statements.  Find out about employer benefits that your spouse may have, such as 401K or HSA accounts.  Think outside the box to assets your spouse may hold that may not be as obvious, such as a large number of frequent flyer miles or a side business with his or her family that brings in a certain income.  
  2. Get organized about money coming in or out from you own side.  You likely have a general idea about your own income and debts, but you will want to save that information in an organized manner.  Do you know where your tax information is?  Refresh your records on your savings accounts, investment accounts, etc.  
  3. Prepare your information in a place that will be easy to access after the divorce.  After you have documented information about your collective finances, you need to save it in a place that will be easily accessible, such as your workplace or in the possession of a family member.  Even where both parties are civil, keeping this information in a neutral place will avoid the potential for uncomfortable situations.
  4. Get property valued before the divorce.  Getting a valuation of property may be valuable down the road, but your ability to do or the value in this information highly depends on the types of assets involved and their value.  Some ideas to consider include:  Taking the ring into a local jewelry store for assessment.  Asking a car dealership the trade in value of your vehicles. Obtaining an appraisal of the home.
  5. Update your job resume before filing.  If your spouse provides the financial support for your family, you may want to consider getting additional job training or education before filing.  You may not end up receiving as much support from your ex-spouse as you need, so being able to step into the job market will empower you.
  6. Look at the date you are planning to file.  The timing of your divorce can be important in some cases.  Is your spouse expecting a large bonus or promotion soon?  Do you have a large financial obligation pending, such as a house under contract as buyer or seller?  Is one of your children approaching their 18th birthday?  Consider everything before deciding when to pull the plug.
  7. Plan ahead for health insurance.  If your insurance is through your spouse’s employer, you may want to see what other health insurance options will be available to you.  You may be able to find options that are less expensive or you may be able to find employment where you can get health insurance benefits on your own.
  8. Consider what you value most.  It’s a good idea to think ahead and decide what you value most and what you want to fight for, so that you can advise your attorney on what success looks like for you in the divorce.  Do you want to stay in the family home?  Do you care about the timeshare?  Think ahead logically.  One mistake often made in divorce is that the parties get caught up in the anger and spite and spend a lot of money on an issue that they don’t care about that much.  Before the fireworks start, think about what you must have and what you can give up.
  9. Don’t assume that something is your because it is in your name. You may think that because an asset is in your name that it can’t be divided up in the divorce, but that often is not the case.  When you are looking at your financial landscape, consider that assets and liabilities are likely to be taken into account regardless of the superficial designation of ownership.
  10. Seek professional advice.  Even if you haven’t decided for sure whether you want to leave the marriage, you can seek advice from an attorney on how to plan ahead financially in the event that divorce is the right decision for you.  

Never Do These 5 Things after Being Charged with a DUI

If you’ve been charged with a DUI, you certainly have many worries and concerns about what you should and shouldn’t do.  This article will walk you through a list of actions you should avoid at this critical time, so that you can be in the best position to resolve your case as favorably as possible.   

    1. Don’t panic or give up.  A DUI can be one of the most stressful events in your life, so it’s understandable that you might panic or want to give up on all the good things you are doing in your life, like work or fulfilling family responsibilities.  Hire a great attorney as soon as possible and let your attorney guide you through this experience.  Ask your attorney a lot of questions, so that you understand the process. Don’t berate yourself for what can’t be changed and focus on problem solving in the future.

 

  • Don’t delay in hiring an attorney.  Don’t delay in hiring your attorney because you will have a DMV hearing typically prior to the resolution of your DUI case in court. After an arrest for DUI, the officer is required by law to immediately forward a copy of the notice of suspension or revocation form and any driver license taken into possession to the DMV.  The DMV automatically conducts an administrative review that includes an examination of the officer’s report, the suspension or revocation order, and any test results.  You have the right to request a hearing from the DMV within 10 days of receipt of the suspension or revocation order, and your attorney can assist you in the DMV hearing.
  • Don’t drive on a suspended or revoked license, don’t get another DUI, and don’t commit any other crimes.  Although it seems fairly obvious that you shouldn’t drive on a suspended or revoked license or commit any other crimes, it is somewhat common for defendants to slip up in this area.  This is a risk you do not want to take.  The penalties are enhanced for subsequent DUI offenses.  Plan ahead.  Look at public transportation or find someone to drive you to work so that you don’t get in a situation where you feel forced to drive on a suspended or revoked license.  If you are attending an event or party, make sure that your keys are safely out of your reach and that you are prepared to take a cab or Uber.  Discuss with your attorney and your family the strategies you will employ to avoid getting in trouble.
  • Don’t post publicly on Facebook or Social Media.  Consider changing your public social media accounts to private.  Do you have pictures of yourself with a drink in hand on the night you were arrested for the DUI?  You can’t destroy or delete evidence, but you are not under obligation to keep your social media account public.  Also, refrain from posting any new information about the DUI. Consult with your attorney about information on your social media accounts, as he or she will be in the best position to advise you how pictures or posts may impact your case.
  • Don’t forget to write down what happened right away.  Your memory is best when it’s fresh, so take the time right after your DUI to sit down and write everything you can remember:
  • When, where, and how were you stopped?
  • What did the officer say when he stopped you?  
  • What did you tell the officer?
  • What type of tests did you do?
  • How did you perform on those tests?
  • Was a breath test administered?  Where, when and how?
  • Was there anything that impacted the tests?  busy traffic, health impediments, etc.

 

In sum:  The most important step you need to take right now is to relax and look to building your case by finding a good attorney as soon as possible, avoiding escalating your problems with other offenses, being aware of your public posts, and recording your recollections as soon as possible to assist your attorney in providing an excellent defense for you.